ED 603 - Instructional Technology In Schools

September 6th, 2020

1.6 Choose 3 + Tech Space: Learner

Each "tech space" activity serves two purposes:

  1. an opportunity for you to demonstrate what you gained from the 3 resources that you chose to engage with from the list above, and

  2. a way for you to choose a new technology tool to experiment with that relates to the current module topic.

September 13th 2020

2.2 Choose 3 + Tech Space: Leader

Each "tech space" activity serves two purposes:

  1. an opportunity for you to demonstrate what you gained from the 3 resources that you chose to engage with from the list above, and

  2. a way for you to choose a new technology tool to experiment with that relates to the current module topic.

September 20th, 2020

2.4 Tech Tool Eval 1

  • The name of the tool that I used is called Wizer (wizer.me). It is an easy and intuitive tool to create online quizzes and assignments. I thought it'd be great for a simple/quick grammer quiz.

  • I found Wizer through Edutopia. Specifically an article titled "Essential Apps for the Physical and Digital Classroom" by Vicki Davis.

  • Summary/Evaluation/Analysis of the tool:

    • Why did you select it? Why was that tool more engaging than the other tools?

      • I selected this tool because while teaching middle school ELA last year, I covered and gave weekly quizzes on grammar topics. These were always done on pen and paper, which limited the scale, as well was wasteful (110 students). The Wizer format is super intuitive to create assignments, and for students it would be easy to pick up and use. Also, I believe that middle schoolers can still enjoy the "fun-ness" of the interface.

    • If you were to recommend this tool(s) to teachers, in what educational setting (P – 20) would it be best utilized?

      • I think certainly it is best suited for a younger 3rd to 5th grade population. But I feel that 6th-8th can still very much enjoy it without being distracted by the colors and whatnot. I think that it could be possible in a HS setting, but that would depend on the tone and tenor of the teacher. A fun, and goofy teacher could pull it off. The serious lecturer would probably just confuse the class pulling this out.

    • Are there any disadvantages to this program that you encountered while experimenting with it?

      • It was somewhat limiting in the style of question formats you can use/choose from. If I spent more time on it I think that I'd be able to figure more ways to get more out of it, but upon first use, I came up against at least one wall.

    • How you think it can contribute to student learning in the 21st century?

      • It is getting this to engage with technology in a productive manner that is designed, structured, and administered by you the teacher. 

    • How is the use of tools such as this one supported by the ISTE standards, SAMR model, TPACK framework, and the TQS Standards/NM Teacher Competencies?

      • I believe that within the SAMR model, Wizer could fill a role within the Modification or Redefinition branches. I believe that there is enough functionality to it that to be able to not just take the place of traditional paper quizzes or assignments, but the ability to have multiple versions built-in through their differentiation tools means that you can best support all students, without leaving quality on the table, or working yourself even more. Another big piece of this is that the Wizer website is a massive community resource for teachers. Quizzes that have been created for nearly every single subject and topic are on the site (you must assign a subject when you make the quiz) meaning that there is tons of inspiration and groundwork set. Before I started making mine, I browsed around seeing how others had done things and got some ideas. That collaboration is huge as a teacher.

    • How the literature supports the implementation of this tool? (this should be woven throughout your analysis)?

      • The idea of collaboration was really important in the effectiveness of the tool. The idea of educators across the country and world sharing ideas and skills with each other to better education as a whole, as well as the idea of students being able to share in the experiences through creating their own work, and reaping the rewards of their teacher reaching out for information (ISTE, NETP, John Spencer). The ability to best structure the works you're creating also is important to using technology effectively (Koehler & Mishra). Wizer can be applied and used in so many different ways, subjects, topics, and grades, that you really can make it universally effective.

  • References

September 27th, 2020

3.1 Choose 3 + Tech Space: Citizen

Each "tech space" activity serves two purposes:

  1. an opportunity for you to demonstrate what you gained from the 3 resources that you chose to engage with from the list above, and

  2. a way for you to choose a new technology tool to experiment with that relates to the current module topic.

October 4th, 2020

3.3 Digital Literacy Lesson Teach

Map out a lesson (you may totally steal or adapt any one of the lessons from the Teaching Tolerance digital literacy framework, as they are licensed under creative commons) that you will be able to teach in the next week, or that you can integrate into a content lesson that you will deliver in the next week.  Remember, many of the concepts and skills that we teach can be enhanced with digital literacy skills (in other words, teaching digital literacy does not have to be a standalone lesson!).  As you consider the focus and objectives of your lesson, connect its purpose with both the academic literature and resources that you explored in this module as well as specific ISTE standards and indicators (include at least one standard and multiple indicators, but you may include more).  Remember, this should support what you are currently teaching and help students see the relevance of being a digital citizen in every step of the learning process.

October 11th, 2020

4.1 Choose 3 + Tech Space: Collaborator

Each "tech space" activity serves two purposes:

  1. an opportunity for you to demonstrate what you gained from the 3 resources that you chose to engage with from the list above, and

  2. a way for you to choose a new technology tool to experiment with that relates to the current module topic.

October 18th, 2020

4.3 Tech Tool Eval 2

  • PLN where you found your tech tool to evaluate

    • The PLN where I found my tool is Edutopia.org. It was in an article titled “Using a Portfolio to Document Remote Teaching Experience”, written by Monica Burns from October 15th, 2020.

  • Name of tech tool that you selected and brief description.

    • The tech tool that I selected is called Wakelet. It is an online platform that students can use to create and manage an online and accessible portfolio. It allows the student to upload a variety of media formats and organize in a means of the choosing.

  • Summary of how the literature supports the implementation of this tool (200-300 words)

    • When I think back to elementary and middle school, we were required to keep, add to, and continue to carry on a portfolio through the years. At that time, it was simply a school district issued bi-fold folder, stuffed with writing and work in no particular order, importance, or thought. Wakelet is an opportunity for students to create a portfolio for quality work that can be easily accessed, revised, moved forward and managed. Within the SMAR model, I would classify Wakelet as an augmentation and leaning towards modification depending on how it is applied by educators. By having a means of organizing their work over multiple years, while keeping is constantly accessible, teachers can always have a means of looking back and evaluating student progress. I can see this as especially beneficial for interventions where having longitudinal data can best inform practices and interventions.

    • Another scenario where I see this fitting into the modification level of SAMR is its ability for yearly work portfolios to be used in way for the student to address and recognize their own progress. As an ELA teacher, if I could have students go back to their end-of-year work from the previous school year, provide feedback and improvements, it can show them where and how their literacy skills have increased. This is important not just for their literacy skills, but also can benefit social-emotional learning skills such as self-efficacy and self-awareness.

  • Evaluation of the tool:Why did you select it? Why was that tool more engaging than the other tools?

    • I selected Wakelet because I believe it is a tool that I could absolutely use in my future ELA classrooms. I have always liked and wanted to implement the idea of a yearly or end-of-year portfolio, so this was perfect when I came across it.

  • If you were to recommend this tool(s) to teachers, in what educational setting (P – 20) would it be best utilized?

    • I believe that it can be used from as early a grade as students are able to simply navigate websites. I think that it become more important and could be most beneficial as students get older and having strong records and evidence of their academic work becomes more important as their approach college age.

  • Are there any disadvantages to this program that you encountered while experimenting with it?

    • Other than being a little limited in how you could visually organize your Wakelet, I did not find myself limited in what I wanted to be able to create using it.

  • How you think it can contribute to student learning in the 21st

    • I think that Wakelet can allow for students to be more positively engaged with adding and ingesting media on the internet. This tool can help students share what they are proud of and have accomplished, as well as allow them to interact with others who are doing the same, particularly through the “save” function.

  • How is the use of tools such as this one supported by the ISTE standards, SAMR model, TPACK framework, and the TQS Standards/NM Teacher Competencies?

    • See my above explanation in its ties to SAMR.

  • References (websites, readings, blogs)

November 8th, 2020

5.1 Choose 3 + Tech Space: Designer

Each "tech space" activity serves two purposes:

  1. an opportunity for you to demonstrate what you gained from the 3 resources that you chose to engage with from the list above, and

  2. a way for you to choose a new technology tool to experiment with that relates to the current module topic.

November 1st, 2020

5.3 Tech Tool Eval 3

  • PLN where you found your tech tool to evaluate

    • I found QR Code Generator through Edutopia. Specifically an article titled "Setting Up Easy Access to Digital Content in Elementary School" by Justine Bruyère.

  • Name of tech tool that you selected and brief description.

    • The tech tool that I selected is called QR Code Generator. It is an online platform that students can use to create QR codes that they can link to work of various different mediums.

  • Summary of how the literature supports the implementation of this tool (200-300 words)

    • I believe that this QR generator could be a useful and engaging tool for students in the classroom. I foresee that it can help build a strong sense of sharing, collaboration, and engagement by giving students a different, interesting, anonymous, and creative means to share their work.

    • Something that I feel is important and should be emphasized more in an ELA class is for more opportunities to openly share student work. It can be difficult to do it in the traditional sense of printing out writing assignments etc. and posting them over the walls. This usually does not generate much traffic. However, if the walls and boards of the classroom are covered in QR codes, I would see students, and staff, being immediately more interested.

    • In a structured setting, you could have students walk around with their phones, tablets, or Chromebook, scan the codes, and ingest the work. Because the QR codes themselves are completely anonymous, students will be picking at complete random, ensuring a mix of whose work is viewed. This could be paired with a feedback activity (leave comments on a document), learning activity (like a gallery walk), or an interesting way for formative assessment (generic questions, but students pick 5 and answer them about the days topics).

    • I think that QR codes could be utilized in several creative ways by both students and teachers that would allow for some new and different approaches in the classroom.

  • Evaluation of the tool: Why did you select it? Why was that tool more engaging than the other tools?

    • I selected QR Code Generator because I believe it is a tool that I could absolutely use in my future ELA classrooms. I have wanted to find more way for students to easily share their work in ways that are easily accessible. There are a number of classroom activities where I see this being a useful tool..

  • If you were to recommend this tool(s) to teachers, in what educational setting (P – 20) would it be best utilized?

    • I believe that it can be used from as early a grade as students are able to simply navigate websites. The early part of the creator steps could possibly be a little confusing, but after a guided explanation and practice, I feel that students of most ages will have no trouble being able to create a QR code.

  • Are there any disadvantages to this program that you encountered while experimenting with it?

    • To attach more complex and larger files, there are more challenging steps, but for basic use it is very straightforward.

  • How you think it can contribute to student learning in the 21st

    • I believe that using QR codes is something we are seeing much more of in general in the world, especially with smartphones becoming ubiquitous. Teaching students how to use these tools, and structured productive opportunities to use them means they will be better equipped in the future.

  • How is the use of tools such as this one supported by the ISTE standards, SAMR model, TPACK framework, and the TQS Standards/NM Teacher Competencies?

    • I think that this QR code tool can really fit within the TPACK model. It is a modern 21st century tool that allows for better use and utilization of a traditional pedagogical method. Sharing work is an educational tool as old as time, and giving the student modern means to do it is meeting them at their strengths, while also accomplishing classroom and standard learnings.

  • References (websites, readings, blogs)

November 8th, 2020

6.1 Choose 3 + Tech Space: Facilitator

Each "tech space" activity serves two purposes:

  1. an opportunity for you to demonstrate what you gained from the 3 resources that you chose to engage with from the list above, and

  2. a way for you to choose a new technology tool to experiment with that relates to the current module topic.

November 15th, 2020

6.2 Educational Technology Lesson Teach

Map out a lesson that integrates educational technology into a content lesson that you will deliver in the next week or two.  As you consider the focus and objectives of your lesson, connect its purpose with both the academic content as well as specific ISTE standards and indicators (include at least one standard and multiple indicators, but you may include more).  Remember, the technology that you choose to teach students should support what you are currently teaching and strive to find the intersection of TPACK (technology, content & pedagogy).

November 29th, 2020

7.2 Digital Portfolio: Final Screencast Tour

A final activity for ED 603 will be a screencast tour of your portfolio with a reflective analysis of your growth throughout this first semester in your teaching positions.  You are telling your story, not just showing us what is on each page, which is something that we can do without a screencast.  Please make sure to follow the helpful tips below as you create your screencast, as these align with the criteria in the rubric.

 
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